Knock off the Talk: Not Happening

My apologies to those that don’t want to see another Favre post. In July, you have to go with what the talk is. Once there is real news, this Favre thing will be history, at least here, anyway.

This post is more of a post about what someone in saying about Favre rather than the saga itself.

In today’s Chicago Tribune, David Haugh opines that the Bears ought to do whatever they have to, including offering up a first-round pick, Ricky Manning Jr. and a later draft pick to secure Favre’s services. The print addition and the home page of chicagosports.com has a clever little illustration of Favre in the blue & orange. Nice.

In my opinion, Haugh does a good job of almost convincing the reader that his proposal might actually happen. But no way in hell it does. It is Haugh’s job to come up with outlandish ideas and write about them to attract attention to himself and his paper, that’s totally understood. He does a more sensible job of that than say, Jay Mariotti. But the reader has to know there is a better chance of Favre joining Dancing with the Stars in 2008 than the Bears securing his rights in a trade.

Haugh points out that it is very, very unlikely that the Packers would trade Favre to the Bears under any circumstance. I think it’s more than very, very, unlikely, it’s impossible. But what Haugh fails to mention, which I did last week and is very clear to me, is that making a bold move such as this would be inconceivable more to Bears management than to the Packers. Why? Because in my opinion, from the Chairman of the Board of the Bears, down to Ted Phillips, Jerry Angelo and the Head Coach, since the mid-1980′s the Bears organization has been more concerned with proving their plan/agenda works than with winning at any cost.

And by far the majority of the time, their plan/agenda has NOT worked, as we all know. In the late 1980′s, Michael McCaskey declared a “new era of fiscal responsibility” and jettisoned popular all-pro’s such as Wilber Marshall and Willie Gault. His agenda was to prove that no player was worth the money they demanded, and also that he and personnel boss Bill Tobin would easily find replacements for them. Didn’t happen.

McCaskey’s agenda then became to prove that he and Dave Wannstedt would build a team that would “win so many Super Bowls they would retire the trophy.” He stuck with Wannstedt for 5 years before firing him.

The two times the organization did make bold moves, abandon their plans, and think out of the box was when Virginia relieved her son of his duties as team President, and when Ted Phillips decided he was open to hiring the organization’s first General Manager since Jerry Vainisi was fired in January 1987.

Making a bold move to trade for Favre would be to admit that Jerry Angelo’s plans to draft and develop quarterbacks have failed. And OBVIOUSLY we all know that no Bears GM or coach has drafted and developed a long-term quarterback since Sid Luckman in 1939. But don’t tell the Bears organization that there isn’t still hope for Rex Grossman and Kyle Orton.

5 Responses to “Knock off the Talk: Not Happening”

  1. I’ve been saying for months to quit with the wet dreams. The divsion, as it stands w/o Favre is wide open for all four teams. I’m pretty sure the Packers have no intentions of letting him go to a division. As of now, Favre would make the Bears better, but not Super Bowl contenders. Too many question marks on both sides of the ball. What would be even worse for the Packers if Favre ended up in Minnesota. They’ve got the OL and running game in place, just not a good QB. I seriously doubt the Packers is interested on making them better…

  2. Wow…I was just looking for some information on Willie Gallimore, and I stumbled across possibly the best Bears site on the web! How I only just now found this site is beyond me.

    I agree there’s obviously no way the Packers would trade Favre in the division, but if somehow he convinces them to release him, I definitely think the Bears should try to snatch him up. You’re right about the Bears management caring more about being right than winning, but could the hiring of Kevin Jones be a signal that maybe they’re becoming less stubborn? After all, they were giving us the “we’re happy with what we’ve got” line a few weeks ago. Of course, bringing in a gimpy ex-Lion isn’t exactly a big deal, but hey you’ve gotta start somewhere.

    And to JDM, you’re right about the question marks, BUT if the O-line shores up (which is possible) AND if the defense stays healthy (which is less likely but still possible), I do think the bears will have a very good shot at winning the division. Add a hypothetical Brett Favre to that mix, and I think we could make a decent playoff run.

  3. The only thing that article does is remind us of how desperate the Bears still are for a good QB. But hell, virtually so are the rest of the teams in the NFL. But regardless, a well performing QB starts with the OL. If you can’t pass protect and run block, then it doesn’t matter who you have, whether it be Favre, Marino, Montana, or Cade McNown (just kidding about McNown).

  4. I was the one who said knock off the Favre talk, but only because I want to hear other Bears fans opinions on the Bears. Not to mention the fact that Favre’s posts get about twice as many replies as the others from Bears fans. Oh well, here’s my two cents anyway. About the Bears saying “I like the running backs we have now.” What were they supposed to say, “We are f***ed! Our starter has no experience, our backup is better at special teams than his actual position, and our third string made me realize that Speedy Gonzalez could not make it in the NFL.” They told the media what they had to, while they waited to make sure that Kevin Jones’ knee wasn’t kaput. That being said, I can’t wait to see this duo perform, and I for certain can’t wait to see what a Bears defense with Mike Brown can do. We just need to see our offensive line play for the whole game (unlike last year when it was fourth quarter nap time) and you will see a totally different team on both sides of the ball.

  5. Why would Favre even want to come here? He’d be coming to a team that’s only gonna win 5 or 6 games.

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